National Radio Day

August 20, 2015 is National Radio Day

August 20, 2015 is National Radio Day

National Radio Day is a celebration of the history of radio. Radio serves many people in many ways: on the community level, providing a voice and a platform for those who often struggle to be heard, on the local level, entertaining and informing when critical news breaks and on the national level, with a sense of immediacy and detail that other mediums can’t quite replicate.

On August 20th, there will be a celebration at the Seattle Central Library Plaza from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m that will include a pop up station. Seattle has plenty to celebrate – seven new low-power FM neighborhood radio stations. They’ll cover 90% of the city and be community resources, like The Seattle Public Library.

The Seattle Public Library has even come up with a reading list covering broadcast radio, HAM radio and more.

For more information, go to NationalRadioDay.com

 

Seattle Chosen as Part of “What Works”

The City of Seattle is a leader in utilizing Open Data.  Websites like  data.seattle.gov  and performance.seattle.gov have demonstrated the City’s commitment and effective use of open data resources.

Performance Seattle home page.

Performance Seattle home page.

Now, Bloomberg Charities just chose Seattle as one of the first eight cities to participate in the “What Works Cities” program.

In the next three years, Bloomberg Charities will give 100 cities part of a $42 million initiative aimed at helping cities develop data-driven projects that improve their communities.

Seattle will focus on integrating data and evidence into their contracts to achieve better results.

To learn more and apply to be a What Works City, visit www.WhatWorksCities.org

TMF success: UW Women’s Center’s Making Connections

The University of Washington’s Women’s Center’s Making Connections (MC) program received a Technology Literacy and Access grant for $14, 399 to “provide enriching educational and character-building experiences for underrepresented Seattle-area high school girls to achieve in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM).”

In the 2014-2015 academic year, MC served more than 105 students from 23 high schools in the greater Seattle area.  In addition to new computers at the center, other components of the program include mentoring, tutoring, career exploration, and founding a local chapter of the national “Girls Who Code” program to support MC students who want to pursue computer science. See more here.

Making Connections (MC) also provided opportunities for students to explore careers in STEM fields, which focus on providing a better understanding of what different companies (Boeing, Microsoft, Google, etc.) are like through hearing first-hand from managers and employees themselves. See more here.

“The most important experience of this event was hearing and networking with the Google employees. You learn so much from their past experience to better prepare yourself for your future. I now know that I can still explore different careers, and still have time to find my passion. Also, it was great to see what the Google company has to offer,” said one student who went to Google to participate in a hands-on activity where students could make their own designs for a product.

Mentoring is another core element of the MC program that offers students the ability to work one-on-one with a mentor who can provide them academic, professional, and personal guidance as they prepare for life after high school. Mentors have served in a variety of different fields and include college students, working professionals, and even former Making Connections students who want to give back. Mentors meet one-on-one with their mentees each month, and are up-to-date on resources that can assist their students. – See more here.

 

2014 was a year of accomplishment and transition for the Seattle Department of Information Technology.

The Annual Report also shows what DoIt has learned about internet access and use in Seattle

The Annual Report also shows what DoIt has learned about internet access and use in Seattle

Seattle Channel took home many Emmy Awards. DoIT laid the groundwork for Seattle’s national leadership on our municipal Privacy Principles and Toolkits. We also transferred just over 55% of the City’s 102,000 Web pages into our Content Management System (CMS) and ramped up the migration to the cloud in Office 365.

You can read about these accomplishments and more in the City of Seattle Department of Information Technology 2014 Annual Report.

The projects, metrics and analytics that were either started or completed in 2014 you can find them: our digital cities survey, the technology access and adoption report, infrastructure enhancements, WMBE purchasing, uptime statistics and much more.

2014 was a year where DoIT moved forward with major projects that will take years for completion, while, at the same time, accomplishing some very distinguished goals within the calendar year. The City of Seattle Department of Information Technology 2014 Annual Report  is an user-friendly accounting of DoIt’s accomplishments, metrics and outlook for the future.

http://techtalk.seattle.gov/2015/07/30/18462/

Shaping Seattle Lets You Swipe Through The Construction

Construction. Sometimes it seems like it’s happening everywhere in the City of Seattle.

A wide aerial view of active Seattle development projects that require Design Review.

A wide road view of active Seattle development projects that require Design Review

Now, with a new online map, you can easily keep up with every project on your desktop, laptop or mobile device.

Mayor Ed Murray announced Shaping Seattle: Buildings, a new interactive tool from the Department of Planning and Development. It’s an interactive, online map that provides locations and detailed information of active Seattle development projects that require Design Review.

An aerial view of projects in the South Lake Union area of Seattle.

An aerial view of projects in the South Lake Union area of Seattle.

Shaping Seattle: Buildings offers both road (blue) and aerial views (above).

The interactive map gives you many detailed options and opportunities to comment online and in person.

The interactive map gives you many detailed options and opportunities to comment online and in person.

The app gives users the ability to:

  • View proposed building design and project status
  • Download project documents
  • Comment on the project
  • View upcoming public meetings about the project

You can click on any project and it brings up more detail including the timeline and any upcoming public meetings.

The app was designed using a mobile first approach and uses location awareness. The app was developed with flexibility to scale and add new map layers and additional data sets. It was developed by the IT team of Ken Schell, Julie Gephart, Reiko Feinstein and Tara Zaremba in collaboration with key business staff. From concept through implementation, the team delivered in just under 4 months.

Seattle Channel Launches Non Partisan Video Voters’ Guide

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This year residents of Seattle will vote for City Council candidates by geographic district. This measure, passed by voters in 2013, has brought forth forty-seven different candidates running for the nine council seats. In total, there are 62 candidates running for Seattle and King County offices.

With ballots for the August 4 primary election arriving in your mailbox this week, The Seattle Channel is launching the 2015 primary election Video Voters’ Guide.

votersguide2The non-partisan video guide offers candidates on the primary ballot up to two minutes to issue a prepared statement that outlines the key planks of their platform. The segments are unedited and published online and broadcast on local television. In all, the guide features video statements from 62 candidates for Seattle and King County elected offices. Only positions where three or more candidates filed will appear on the primary ballot.

The Video Voters’ Guide is available on Seattle Channel’s website at www.seattlechannel.org/elections. For easy reference, the candidate statements are organized by race.

“The Video Voters’ Guide is a unique and valuable public resource. It allows voters to hear directly from the candidates in a noncommercial, unmoderated and unedited environment,” said John Giamberso, Seattle Channel’s general manager. “Working with our partners, we’re pleased to provide this comprehensive set of candidate statements which offers another vantage point for voters. The guide brings to life the candidates and the issues in a convenient format.”

The Video Voters’ Guide features candidates who will appear on the primary ballot for Seattle City Council and Seattle School Board. Seven City Council members will be elected by district, with two others elected citywide. That means city voters will vote for three City Council members: one to represent the district they live in and two to represent the city at large.

The guide also features candidates who will appear on the primary ballot for seats on the Port of Seattle Commission and director of the King County Department of Elections.

The Video Voters’ Guide is also airing on Seattle Channel cable channel 21 and King County TV cable channel 22.

cityclublogoThe two-minute video statements from candidates running for Seattle City Council are also featured in Seattle CityClub’s Living Voters Guide (www.livingvotersguide.org), a non-partisan, community-generated online voters’ guide that offers a space for online discussion.

Primary ballots must be postmarked or returned to a ballot drop box by 8 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 4.

Before the Nov. 3 general election, a revised version of the Video Voters’ Guide will be available. The revised guide will feature candidates appearing on the November general election ballot and statements regarding ballot issues.

The Video Voters’ Guide is a project of Seattle Channel, Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission and King County TV.

Seattle Channel is a local TV station that reflects, informs and inspires the community it serves. Seattle Channel presents programs on cable television – channel 21 on Comcast (321 HD) and Wave (721 HD) – and via the Internet to help residents connect with their city. Programming includes series and special features highlighting the diverse civic and cultural landscape of the Pacific Northwest’s premier city.

Community Stories: A Decade Celebrating Diversity

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Seattle Channel is celebrating 10 years of “Community Stories”, the documentary series that spotlights Seattle communities with a focus on diversity and inclusion.

In her blog, Community Stories producer Shannon Gee writes, “Since that first summer in 2005, Community Stories has told inspiring stories from all over the city. We met the tireless volunteers at Seattle’s VA Hospital; saw how Helping Link teaches computer literacy skills and English to Vietnamese immigrants; and followed the Post-Prison Education Program, which provides college tuition for ex-cons.”

She adds, “We met a lot of firsts, too. Harold Mills, the first African American hydroplane racer at Seafair. Bonnie Beers, the city of Seattle’s first female firefighter. Dr. Ruby Shu, the first Japanese American female doctor in Seattle. We examined history with the story of slain Seattle Filipino American and fishing cannery activists Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes and looked back at how Seattle responded to the emerging AIDS crisis in the 1980s. We said hello to new Hillman City coffee shop Tin Umbrella and goodbye to the beloved Bailey/Coy Books on Broadway.”

In 10 years, Community Stories has been honored with more than 30 Northwest Emmy™ nominations, including five for the series overall, and 10 wins. The latest win was this year. Ian Devier won a Northwest Regional Emmy Award for his editing of “Honor Totem.” The awards didn’t end there.

honortotemyoutubepicIn June, the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) recognized the Seattle Channel with a 2015 Kaleidoscope Award, which honors outstanding achievements in the coverage of diversity. “Honor Totem” is a documentary which chronicled the carving of a totem pole to honor John T. Williams, a First Nations woodcarver who was fatally shot by a Seattle police officer in August 2010. It also detailed the artistic legacy of his family.

Congratulations to Shannon Gee, Ian Devier and everyone at Seattle Channel for 10 years of quality storytelling. Here’s to many more years of celebrating the stories of people who are often overlooked and ignored, but that doesn’t make their voices any less important.

If you’d like to submit story input, want further information or might have a suggestion for Community Stories, please contact Community Stories Senior Producer Shannon Gee at  shannon.gee@seattle.gov