Shaping Seattle Lets You Swipe Through The Construction

Construction. Sometimes it seems like it’s happening everywhere in the City of Seattle.

A wide aerial view of active Seattle development projects that require Design Review.

A wide road view of active Seattle development projects that require Design Review

Now, with a new online map, you can easily keep up with every project on your desktop, laptop or mobile device.

Mayor Ed Murray announced Shaping Seattle: Buildings, a new interactive tool from the Department of Planning and Development. It’s an interactive, online map that provides locations and detailed information of active Seattle development projects that require Design Review.

An aerial view of projects in the South Lake Union area of Seattle.

An aerial view of projects in the South Lake Union area of Seattle.

Shaping Seattle: Buildings offers both road (blue) and aerial views (above).

The interactive map gives you many detailed options and opportunities to comment online and in person.

The interactive map gives you many detailed options and opportunities to comment online and in person.

The app gives users the ability to:

  • View proposed building design and project status
  • Download project documents
  • Comment on the project
  • View upcoming public meetings about the project

You can click on any project and it brings up more detail including the timeline and any upcoming public meetings.

The app was designed using a mobile first approach and uses location awareness. The app was developed with flexibility to scale and add new map layers and additional data sets. It was developed by the IT team of Ken Schell, Julie Gephart, Reiko Feinstein and Tara Zaremba in collaboration with key business staff. From concept through implementation, the team delivered in just under 4 months.

Community Stories: A Decade Celebrating Diversity

cs10year

Seattle Channel is celebrating 10 years of “Community Stories”, the documentary series that spotlights Seattle communities with a focus on diversity and inclusion.

In her blog, Community Stories producer Shannon Gee writes, “Since that first summer in 2005, Community Stories has told inspiring stories from all over the city. We met the tireless volunteers at Seattle’s VA Hospital; saw how Helping Link teaches computer literacy skills and English to Vietnamese immigrants; and followed the Post-Prison Education Program, which provides college tuition for ex-cons.”

She adds, “We met a lot of firsts, too. Harold Mills, the first African American hydroplane racer at Seafair. Bonnie Beers, the city of Seattle’s first female firefighter. Dr. Ruby Shu, the first Japanese American female doctor in Seattle. We examined history with the story of slain Seattle Filipino American and fishing cannery activists Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes and looked back at how Seattle responded to the emerging AIDS crisis in the 1980s. We said hello to new Hillman City coffee shop Tin Umbrella and goodbye to the beloved Bailey/Coy Books on Broadway.”

In 10 years, Community Stories has been honored with more than 30 Northwest Emmy™ nominations, including five for the series overall, and 10 wins. The latest win was this year. Ian Devier won a Northwest Regional Emmy Award for his editing of “Honor Totem.” The awards didn’t end there.

honortotemyoutubepicIn June, the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) recognized the Seattle Channel with a 2015 Kaleidoscope Award, which honors outstanding achievements in the coverage of diversity. “Honor Totem” is a documentary which chronicled the carving of a totem pole to honor John T. Williams, a First Nations woodcarver who was fatally shot by a Seattle police officer in August 2010. It also detailed the artistic legacy of his family.

Congratulations to Shannon Gee, Ian Devier and everyone at Seattle Channel for 10 years of quality storytelling. Here’s to many more years of celebrating the stories of people who are often overlooked and ignored, but that doesn’t make their voices any less important.

If you’d like to submit story input, want further information or might have a suggestion for Community Stories, please contact Community Stories Senior Producer Shannon Gee at  shannon.gee@seattle.gov

City & Community host Get Online Week Dec 3-8

Get Online logo (stoplight with "Get Online" for go light)Learn more about what families can do on the Internet and where to go for training.  This week, December 3rd-8th, twenty community and cultural centers in Seattle are hosting open houses, individual assistance, and workshops at computer learning centers. See the Get Online Week list of sites and activities or contact Vicky Yuki at 206-233-7877 or vicky.yuki@seattle.gov.  Drop by to learn more about using the Internet, online job resources, consumer information, homework help and a world of activities online.

More About Get Online Week and public computing centers:
Get Online Week is being offered by participating centers in partnership with the City of Seattle Department of Information Technology and the Seattle Public Library.

The only way some people have access to computers, the Internet or technology training is to use the services of nearby public computing centers and libraries. Even for those with computers or Internet devices, these centers also offer valuable training in how to find and use essential services and learning materials online. Many of the centers offer instruction in other languages or specialize in serving specific residents, such as youth, seniors, or the disabled community.

Get Online Week started in 2010 as a one-day event at 10 participating centers in Seattle’s central and south neighborhoods. Get Online Weeks are also held in Europe. This Community Technology education program is part of the City’s effort to ensure digital inclusion and foster broadband adoption.

$75,000 in prizes for best apps – deadline Sept 6

The State of Washington, King County, and the City of Seattle are alerting local applications developers that the deadline for submitting apps to the Evergreen Apps Challenge is only one week away. Eligible entries should be submitted before 5 pm PST on Thursday, Sept 6.

The Challenge is open to people who live, work or study in Washington State and Washington small businesses with fewer than 50 employees.

 “The Evergreen Apps Challenge encourages people to find interesting and innovative ways to use government data to improve their community”, said Ted Schmitt, chair of Seattle’s Citizens Telecommunications and Technology Advisory Board. “This is a great opportunity for application developers, designers, entrepreneurs and anyone with ideas for improving their community to leverage the data our government creates everyday to create fun, useful and accessible tools for everyone.”

 The StateCounty, and City have all made datasets available for public use, though any data about Washington State, King County or Seattle can be used for the challenge. Review detailed rules at http://www.evergreenapps.org/ to see if your application or idea is eligible.

 Prizes will be awarded on October 1 at a celebration at Seattle Center.

 

 

What do you want to ask Mayor McGinn?

Wednesday, August 22, at 7 p.m. is Ask The Mayor on the Seattle Channel. Got a burning question?  

Here’s how to get your question to Mayor McGinn:

  1. Call 206-684-8821 during the live show from 7-8 p.m. on Wed., Aug. 22.
  2. Email: askthemayor@seattle.gov
  3. Submit a question online: seattlechannel.org/AskTheMayor
  4. Twitter: @SeattleChannel
  5. Facebook: facebook.com/SeattleChannel

 

Grant available to engage communities & neighborhoods using online technology!

Background

The Online Boost Project was developed in response to what we learned from the Seattle Communities Online assessment and presentations at Neighborhood District Council and community group meetings. Neighborhood groups want to build their capacity to do effective outreach online, maintain their content, foster online engagement and use City widgets and tools.

We are looking for up to 15 projects who will receive up to $1000 in matching funds and will also participate in workshops with experts in using social media. Our goal is to boost their capacity through a project that takes them 3 months or less to complete. This is a one-time initiative and not something we’re currently able to commit to on an ongoing basis.  This program is administered by Community Technology Program of the City of Seattle Department of Information Technology (DoIT).

Program Goals

The Online Boost Project is designed to enhance skills and proficiency on the use of online resources for community groups with workshops, mentorship and seed funding to implement and/or increase their web presence. In coordination with the Seattle Communities Online initiative, we are seeking opportunities to enhance:

  • Increased awareness of community issues;
  • Increased community participation in problem solving; and
  • Increased interaction with government.

Online Boost grantees will have access to:

  • Up to $1000 mini-grants for a quick, specific project to be completed within 3 months.
  • Workshop (required in order to receive funding) where participants would leave the workshop knowing what resources are out there, what their plan of action will be, and how to go about implementing.
  • Mentorship and networking opportunities

The deadline is Tuesday, July 12 at midnight. The application is submitted online and all interested groups must register ahead of time in order to access the application.  You can register at: http://webgrants.seattle.gov.  If you have already registered for another grant with the City, you can log in with your user ID and password and select “Funding Opportunities” and then “Online Boost Grant.”

For help and resources visit the Online Boost Project at http://www.seattle.gov/seattlecommunitiesonline/boost.htm.

For in-person help please contact:

Amy Hirotaka, amy.hirotaka@seattle.gov, by phone at 206-733-9445; or

Vicky Yuki, vicky.yuki@seattle.gov, by phone at 206-233-7877.

Slow Broadband for Low Income, Map Doesn’t Tell Full Story

The FCC recently released the first federal broadband map. It’s definitely worth taking a peek at, and is a valiant first try… But, and there are a lot of buts to this, it’s critical to look at what’s missing as much as what’s there.
The map includes presents reports on advertised speeds, not actual speeds. The speeds are download speeds, and don’t reflect the upload speeds that govern how fast you can post content, send data or provide online services. The map provides a useful broad brush of coverage, but doesn’t ensure that the service is fully available in a given area. Lastly, there is nothing about cost of services.

The cost and speed combination are a critical issue for low income families trying to keep up with growing digital expectations (“Just send it to me, because of course you have hi speed Internet at home…”). A new report that looks a little deeper found that low income urban neighborhoods and rural areas pay more for the service they get than wealthy suburbs. See an article in the New Republic, “Do Low-Income Households Get Slow Broadband by Design?” by Benjamin Orr from the New Republic and the initial article, “Wealthy suburbs get best broadband deals; D.C., rural areas lag behind” by John Dunbar for
The Investigative Reporting Workshop at the American University School of Communications.