Civic Tech Roundup: December 29, 2016

Seattle happenings

  • The Let It Snow! Community Design Workshop presented by the City in partnership with Substantial and Open Seattle was a success, with approximately 30 participants across government, the tech industry, and community members. The event received widespread media coverage, including television coverage from Q13 Fox, radio coverage on KNKX, and online coverage at Geekwire, Madison Park Times, and 21st Century State. You can read more about the event on the Substantial blog as well, or dig into datasets, either by exploring these direct links or going to data.seattle.gov and typing “storm response.”

National news

  • Here’s one way to end 2016 with a bang: New York City announced that it is building a 254,000 square foot facility to facilitate civic technology work. It will include classrooms, meeting rooms, office spaces, and a food hall. Activities will be managed by the existing nonprofit Civic Hall, and will include tech education in partnership with General Assembly as well as work to advance social equity through technology through partnership with Coalition for Queens. At a cost of around $250 million, this marks the largest investment yet by a municipal government in civic technology. (StateScoop)

Must-reads

  • Tom Friedman was a guest on Kara Swisher’s Recode Decode podcast and broke a small section of the internet with his comments on technology, policy, and social change. The podcast covered a wide range of subjects emerging from his new book, Thank You for Being Late. He traces many of the innovations at the turn of the century to the dramatic drop in the cost of connectivity starting in 2000 – and the increase in the spread of ideas and the devolution of greater power to individual people that came with it. The interview covers ethics, education, the new economy, media, social media, social change, and fake news, among others, and puts the civic technology movement in a broader context. (Recode)
  • Fast Company documents the huge range of technology-related activities at the federal level that the Obama administration has introduced and developed over the last 8 years, including ambitious data projects, the recruitment of pioneering tech experts, and the development of structures that allow these activities to take place at a greater scale. There are many open questions about how this infrastructure will be used by a new administration, and those who started it hope that their legacies of encouraging citizen participation, more effectively delivering government services, and building trust will continue. (Fast Company)

Upcoming events

Community events with a civic tech component:

  • Wednesday, January 25, 10:00-11:30 am @ Impact Hub Seattle: “Community Cross-Pollinators: Technology + Social Impact.” Free. (RSVP)

If you’d like to suggest events or content, please email us at civic.tech@seattle.gov.

Civic Tech Roundup: December 15, 2016

Hi folks – this was slated for publication on December 15 but got held up in reviews due to approving staff out of office. We’re publishing today (December 20) but the content is written for December 15 publication. You can expect the next edition on December 29.

Seattle happenings

  • Today’s civic tech-focused edition of local newsletter The Evergrey featured Open Seattle and its lead organizer/founder, Seth Vincent. After highlighting the projects Open Seattle has worked on since late 2012, the authors note that, “today Open Seattle is at a crossroads. After the election we just had, people around the city want to work together in what feels like drastically uncertain times. And Open Seattle, which has struggled to complete some of its projects and to draw a broad selection of people to design and lead them, is looking for new energy.” Tuesday’s Meetup focused on the future of the group. You have until January 17 to apply to be an organizer of Open Seattle.
  • Seattle Department of Transportation’s Winter Weather Map was highlighted by several media outlets as we faced the first snow of the year last Friday. To facilitate the creation of similar tools, including by members of the community, the City plans to release the data behind this map as open data by the end of 2016.

National news

  •  We’re not the only ones who did a recap of the Code for America Summit. The GovEx DataPoints podcast offered a full review as well, noting that the nation is moving beyond “cute visualizations” or a straightforward transparency agenda to more significant work with public data that influences policy and processesA. “People are now going deeper and thinking about how they can solve major problems with their data,” noted Sheila Dugan, a senior program officer at GovEx. StateScoop also covered Jazmyn Latimer’s work on Clear My Record, which she presented at the Summit.
  • There’s no slowing of interest in civic hacking as a mechanism for addressing seemingly intractable problems through technology. There were two major civic hackathons already this month – the Jersey City Hackathon for Sustainability and a hackathon around foster care in NYC.
  • Civic User Testing groups (or CUT groups) are taking off nationally as civic tech makers seek to ensure that new tech tools are usable for the wide range of people who depend on them. Some have been launched by community groups, as in the case of Code for Miami, while others are led by organizations such as Smart Chicago, which created the model. (GovTech)

New tools

  • The AllTransit database brings together data from multiple agencies and cities to make it easier to see how well particular areas are served by public transit – identifying “transit deserts” and seeing how transit maps to jobs, among other applications. Check out the Housing and Transportation Affordability Index, which provides a more robust picture of housing affordability that includes transportation costs and could be useful for activists and city planners. (GovTech)

On the horizon

  • Autonomous vehicles. And with them, many questions about how cities will respond to them and the 2 petabytes of data they are expected to generate each year and whether regulations will remain consistent across jurisdictions. Two Chicago aldermen have introduced legislation to block fully autonomous vehicles from using roadways within the city limits. Automakers are hoping for the federal government to set regulations so that the same autonomous vehicles could be used across the United States, limiting the ability of individual cities and states to create separate regulations that could influence manufacturing and technology development. The current Department of Transportation leadership supports mandating vehicle-to-vehicle or “V2V” communications to help prevent collisions. Meanwhile, Google’s self-driving car project has spun out into its own company, Waymo, which continues to use data to make the case that self-driving cars could be safer than those governed by humans. With the launch of the new company and site, the detailed monthly reports have disappeared; it remains to be seen whether any sort of mandate around transparency (e.g. releases of crash data) will be part of future regulations.

Upcoming events

Official City events:

  • Thursday, December 15, 5:30-8:30 pm @ Substantial in Capitol Hill: “Let It Snow: Community Design Workshop.” (Full)

Community events with a civic tech component:

  • Wednesday, December 14, 6:00-9:00 pm @ Socrata: “Designing Open Seattle’s Role in Civic Tech Post-Election.” Free. (RSVP)
  • Wednesday, January 25, 10:00-11:30 am @ Impact Hub Seattle: “Community Cross-Pollinators: Technology + Social Impact.” Free. (RSVP)

If you’d like to suggest events or content, please email us at civic.tech@seattle.gov.

Civic Tech Roundup: November 23, 2016

Seattle happenings

  • Check out yesterday’s recap of the Code for America Summit, a collaborative effort from Seattle IT, Seattle Police Department, and the Mayor’s Innovation Team. We continue to explore how we can bring more user-centered design to the services we provide as a city and the technology we use to support them.
  • Startup Week Seattle was as energetic as ever. For the first time, we presented a civic & social impact track with 5 events – three with City involvement. Approximately 150 people attended our events on edtech, civic tech, and inclusive design. Special thanks again to all our speakers and congratulations to all the successful track organizers, which focused on everything from “real talk” on diversity in tech to the evolving AR/VR landscape. Check out this recap of the civic startups panel on StateScoop and explore all the events and companies at seattle.startupweek.co.
  • On November 9, Open Seattle launched a new meetup, OpenIDEO, focused on user-centered design and design thinking. You do not have to have technical skills to participate. For more on this meetup or to attend the next event on December 7, visit the new outpost’s Meetup page.
  • Love Seattle? Love tech? You have until November 30 to apply to be an organizer of Open Seattle.

National news

  • A new app called Nexar is crowdsourcing traffic data in San Francisco and New York. The app is free; the company has $14.5 million in backing, with a business model around monetizing crowdsourced data. The founders say this data has value for insurance companies now and the makers of autonomous vehicles later. (GovTech)
  • The City of San Rafael has implemented a just-launched tool called ProudCity Service Center that embeds directly into Facebook, allowing users to find information, make payments, submit service requests, and provide feedback all from a simple initial interface. (GovTech)
  • Is the future of open data open source? A new product from GIS company Boundless believes so, switching up the traditional gov-SaaS business model, around licensing for individual users, to a model more focused on providing central support for agencies that operate at scale. It’s worth keeping an eye on as the civic tech sector and government in general wrestle with the tradeoffs between open-source and proprietary software. (GovTech)

New tools

  • Escape Your Bubble, a Chrome extension that interrupts your Facebook news feed with clearly marked stories from “the other side” (you can choose whether you wish to better understand Republicans or Democrats) is just one of several civic-minded apps and offline efforts to emerge in the immediate aftermath of the election. In “Coders Think They Can Burst Your Filter Bubble With Tech,” Emily Dreyfuss lists them all. (Wired)
  • Pittsburgh’s new Burgh’s Eye View app is an open-source tool that displays geocoded open data about service requests, arrests, code violations, and more. (CityInspired)

Must-reads
Is civic tech partisan? Harvard Kennedy School’s David Eaves says it can’t be. Code for America Founder Jen Pahlka says it fundamentally isn’t. FedScoop asked both sides of the aisle. Everyone seems to agree that good government technology isn’t a partisan issue – but 18F has taken a stand in small ways on things like gender and racial equality, and the civic tech movement is fundamentally oriented around the notion that government should be accountable to people. It’s unclear whether those values will carry forward, and there’s an active debate among thought leaders as to where the work can and should go from here.

  • In “Looking Forward: How Civic Technology Can Bridge the Divide,” AppCityLife CEO Lisa Abeyta urges civic technologists to stay focused on tangible outcomes. She writes: “We must continue to develop and share the technology and tools that can deliver better self-service access to the information and services we need within our own communities, urban or rural, that empower us to make informed decisions, interact with our government, and improve our own economic mobility.” (Inc.)
  • 18F’s Noah Kunin says he’s staying to work for Trump.”My oath to this country was not to a particular office, or person, and certainly not to a political party. It was to the Constitution and to the people (emphasis added)” (Medium)
  • Civic tech, government tech, and urban tech are often used interchangeably, but to many in the fields, they are not the same thing. In a post-election essay, “How Civic Tech Should Respond to Our New Reality,” Personal Democracy Media/Personal Democracy Forum founder Andrew Rasiej urges the civic tech community to stay focused on equity, even when that is perceived as political. “If [civic tech] is to ever fulfill its promise,” he writes, “our field must become a champion for decency, equity, and openness, and to do everything it can to fight bigotry, racism, and hate. The fear of openly talking about these subjects at Summit makes me also fear that the civic tech community has not yet developed enough to know when to recognize the difference between partisanship and an existential threat.” (Civicist)

On the horizon

  • From 911 to 311 to crisis hotlines, governments operate a lot of call centers. But could any of those services be automated? What about gamified? In “The Future of 311 could be weird,” David Dudley writes, “The ultimate goal, many 311 experts say, is to allow cities to forge a frictionless and spookily immersive e-commerce kind of relationship with its residents, complete with the ability to predict their wants and needs.” Quoting Andrew Nicklin from the Johns Hopkins Center for Government Excellence: “In an ideal universe, your interaction with government would be so seamless you don’t even know it’s government.” That ideal may not be far away. (CityLab)

Upcoming events

Community events with a civic tech component:

  • Wednesday, November 30, 7-8:30 pm @ University of Washington Kane Hall: “My Politics as a Technologist,” featuring civic technology legends Terry Winograd and Alan Borning. Free. (RSVP)
  • Wednesday, December 7, 6:00-9:00 pm @ Impact Hub Seattle: OpenIDEO meetup about civic engagement and employment in the age of automation. Free. (RSVP)
  • Wednesday, December 14, 6:00-9:00 pm @ Socrata: “Designing Open Seattle’s Role in Civic Tech Post-Election.” Free. (RSVP)
  • Wednesday, January 25, 10:00-11:30 am @ Impact Hub Seattle: “Community Cross-Pollinators: Technology + Social Impact.” Free. (RSVP)

If you’d like to suggest events or content, please email us at civic.tech@seattle.gov.

Center for Digital Government Names Seattle Digital Cities Survey Winner

Brianna Thomas, Legislative Assistant to Lorena Gonzales, accepting Seattle's 2016 Digital Cities Award

Brianna Thomas, Legislative Assistant to Council Member Lorena Gonzales, accepting Seattle’s 2016 Digital Cities Award

Seattle Information Technology (Seattle IT) was recognized for its recent consolidation. The new department is made up of 650 staff members that once worked across 15 city agencies and aims to create efficiencies and capacity for tech projects.

Other accomplishments include: the launch of a mobile-responsive website, a customer relationship management system to improve communications with residents and a data analytics platform for the police department. Efforts to work with the city’s tech community include the hiring of a civic technology advocate to engage with those individuals, a Hack the Commute program that developed prototype apps to help solve transportation issues, and a partnership with Code for America on the development of a crisis intervention app to connect people in need with social services.

In addition, an in-house innovation team is working on data-driven solutions to challenges in Seattle. While an open data program has been in place since 2010, the city’s “open by preference” policy was signed in February and calls on department heads to name “open data champions” to spearhead the release of information.  And for monitoring IT performance, Seattle developed TechStat, which is modeled off programs like the New York City Police Department’s CompStat, to facilitate internal transparency and monitor metrics for operations and projects.

Happy Cyber Security Awareness Month

October is National Cyber Security Month. How will you celebrate?

Seattle IT put together some simple, proactive steps to protect personal, medical, financial, and other sensitive information online.

Take these steps to prevent misuse, abuse, and unauthorized disclosure of your information.

• Regularly review and set security and privacy settings for online accounts to your comfort level. Be aware how much you are sharing and with whom. Be sure to do the same for accounts of children and vulnerable family members.

• Keep application, system, and firmware up to date on all PCs, smartphones, and tablets. Software patches and updates often include bug fixes and enhancements to protect against viruses and vulnerabilities.

• Install anti-virus/malware software on all devices, and keep it updated.

• Enforce the use of strong passwords, passphrases, or PINs to access all accounts, devices, and access points. Many devices and online accounts offer additional authentication options (such as Gmail, Hotmail, Facebook, and others) where, in addition to your password, a second authentication step can be used as an added layer of security (such as sending an access code via text message, a biometric check such as fingerprint, or a hardware token).

Cyber Security Awareness Month proclamation

Civic Tech Roundup: October 12, 2016

Seattle happenings

  • Yesterday, the Seattle Trails Alliance released a new app for iOS called Seattle Trails. The app, which got its start at the AT&T Mobile Parks & Rec Hackathon back in March, shows precise locations of trails in Seattle Parks as well as what kind of trail they are–gravel, bridge, paved, trail–and allows users to give feedback directly in the app. The app was developed by volunteers led by Eric Mentele, Theodore Abshire, and David Wolgemuth, with support from Seattle Parks Trails Manager Chukundi Salisbury. Thanks to volunteer Craig Morrison, an Android version is also in development. Ironically, on my way to the event yesterday, I followed Google Maps rather than the Seattle Trails app and found myself at a private “trailhead” I would have had to spend hours bushwhacking to get up to the real trailhead for the St. Mark’s Greenbelt. Next time, I’ll use the app! You can download it here.
  • Rebekah Bastian, VP of Product at Zillow, wrote an op-ed in the Huffington Post, “How Tech Communities Can Create Social Change.” She shares the steps she took to learn about homelessness before designing a solution and then highlights the Community Pillar program that emerged, through which 20,000 landlords and property managers have signed up to rent to people who might not otherwise find housing in the Seattle market. “We in the tech community have a unique opportunity to use our skills, resources and passion to create change,” she writes. “And with that opportunity comes responsibility – responsibility to better the communities that are supporting our growth.”
  • In “Seattle’s Virtual Road to Transcendence,” Seattle Weekly explores how our city’s VR/AR developers are breaking ground by going beyond traditional gaming to applications of virtual and augmented reality with potential to “radically transform psychology, medicine, therapy, education, policy-making, social and environmental justice, storytelling, and, ultimately, the limits of human consciousness and perception.”
  • Last weekend, at Zoohackathon at the Woodland Park Zoo, hackers took on various challenges related to wildlife trafficking, including product identification, fundraising for conservation organizations, gaming to raise public awareness of the issue, and, for the winning app, using crowdsourced data to identify the reasons for loss of orangutan habitat. As part of the event, hackers got to meet several of the Zoo’s “animal ambassadors,” experience a night tour, and attend Brew at the Zoo. This was the first global Zoohackathon, with six cities around the world participating. Check out the pre-event story on NPR and summaries in GeekWire and the Zoo’s blog.

 

National news

 

New tools

 

Must-reads

  • Civic technology is breaking out of the GovTech world: TechCrunch published “Creating a New Architecture of Government through Tech and Innovation,” a summary of more than 50 interviews conducted by Harvard’s Hollie Gilman and Georgetown’s Jessica Gover. They conclude: “Building a twenty-first-century government requires a governance structure that enables an internal ecosystem of innovation that invests in technology, better use of data, and partnerships that can measure and deliver results.” Their full report, “The Architecture of Innovation: Institutionalizing Innovation in Federal Policymaking” (launched at the Oct 6 event mentioned above), is well worth a read.
  • The Center for Open Data Enterprise published a new report based on a series of roundtables organized by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy earlier this year. The report addresses key issues in open data, including privacy, data quality, sharing research data, and public-private collaboration. Read the full report or check out this summary in the Huffington Post.
  • This is a must-listen rather than a must-read. In “Blame Game,” episode 8 of the Revisionist History podcast, Malcolm Gladwell breaks down the Toyota “sudden acceleration” scandal that resulted in the recall of 10 million vehicles due to mistrust of the cars’ technology. Spoiler alert: The technology was not to blame. The story has insights for consumers as well as policymakers struggling to understand how technology works and how to ensure it serves the public interest.

 

On the horizon

 

Upcoming events 

Events with official City involvement: 

Community events with a civic tech component:

If you’d like to suggest events or content, please email us at civic.tech@seattle.gov.

Civic Tech Roundup: September 28, 2016

Welcome to the Civic Tech Roundup! If you’d like to suggest content, please email us at civic.tech@seattle.gov.

 

Seattle happenings

 

National news

  • Paris hosted a Smart Cities exhibition this week, showcasing high-impact initiatives from all over the world. DevEx wrote up an overview of four of them: Missing Maps (filling in gaps in data on Open Street Map), CoCity, Smart Favela, and One Heart Spots. Read it here.
  • San Francisco’s Startup-in-Residence program (STiR) just had its demo day, featuring teams that worked with 6 different city agencies to improve their work. Learn more about the teams and watch the entire demo day event.
  • Two investors in Chicago just launched a new $15 million startup fund for civic technology startups called Ekistic Ventures. Read about the effort or visit their site.

 

New tools

  • The Association for Neighborhood & Housing Development created a Displacement Alert Project Map for New York City “designed to show where residential tenants may be facing significant displacement pressures and where affordable apartments are most threatened,” building by building. Explore the map or read about the project.
  • Mississippi’s Secretary of State released a new tool called Y’all Vote. Read GovTech’s summary or check it out.
  • A new open source tool from Chicago called Chi Safe Path allows anyone to report hazards on sidewalks and public walkways – and the data goes directly to the City of Chicago’s 311 services. See it here.

 

Must-reads

  • In “Discrimination by Design,” ProPublica journalist Lena Groeger explores how discrimination shows up in the design of everything from Snapchat filters to the height of overpasses. It’s a must-read for anyone who designs systems, including government officials and technologists who aim to do civic good.
  • Krzysztof Madejski from Code for Poland and and Transparan-CEE wrote an excellent overview of legislative monitoring tools, “Monitoring and Engaging with Democratic Processes.” The article focuses on Central & Eastern Europe, the Balkans, and Eurasia, but has insights for anyone exploring legislative transparency.
  • MySociety’s Myfanwy Nixon shared her organization’s process for recruiting and selecting new trustees in “Recruiting for Diversity: This much we know.” She explains why diversity matters for their organization, how they have attempted to address it, and invites feedback from anyone who has ever considered not applying to a job there for related reasons. They key takeaway: “Where there is no strategy, it allows a status quo to prevail.”
  • Fast Company‘s CoExist blog dove into “The Different Paths Los Angeles and San Francisco Are Taking to Spur Civic Innovation,” highlighting the two city government’s different approaches to engaging startups to improve government services. The key takeaway: There’s no right answer, but “cities need to innovate how they function internally even as they forge external partnerships with startups, tech companies, and private sector professionals, who are bringing in valuable, new ideas to innovate public services.”

 

On the horizon
Civic tech is not as much about technological innovation as it is about applying cutting-edge technologies to the important civic and social questions of our time. I’m adding this section as a way to share breakthroughs that could quickly have applications in civic tech. Let me know what you think!

  • “One of these days, the walls may know when you’re happy, sad, stressed or angry.” That’s the lede from a recent Wall Street Journal article about new technology from MIT called EQ-Radio, which uses an extremely lo-fi radio system to detect physiological changes in the bodies in a room that indicate a change of mood. Said one of the researchers, Dr. Dina Katabi, “All of us share so much in how our emotions affect our vital signs … We get an accuracy that is so high that we can look at individual heartbeats at the order of milliseconds.”

 

Upcoming events 

Events with official City involvement: 

Community events with a civic tech component:

Seattle Channel wins national Excellence in Government Programming award

seattle channel logoFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Sept. 27, 2016

Contact: Lori Patrick, Seattle Channel Communications

lori.patrick@seattle.gov, (206) 733-9764

 City-operated TV station wins 15 awards in national competition

SEATTLE— Seattle Channel was named the best municipal television station in the nation when it received the prestigious Excellence in Government Programming award from the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors (NATOA) at the group’s annual meeting held in Austin, Texas, last week.

Additionally, the city-operated station won 13 government programming awards, including five first-place wins for programming as well as a first-place award for its use of social media.

NATOA honors excellence in broadcast, cable, multimedia and electronic programming produced by local government agencies. This year, NATOA received more than 850 entries submitted in 67 categories by local governments across the country.

“Seattle Channel is an important resource,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “The station’s in-depth programming provides transparency and accountability in city government, sparks civic engagement and helps deepen understanding of local issues and Seattle’s diverse communities.”

This is Seattle Channel’s seventh NATOA win in 10 years for programming excellence. Seattle Channel competed against other government-access TV stations in large U.S. cities. The station was recognized with the top government-programming award in 2007, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2015.

“Seattle Channel continues to be the highest standard in local government programming,” said Seattle City Council President Bruce Harrell. “I am proud of what Seattle Channel does every day in providing transparent and informative programming connecting our residents to the city’s civic, cultural and community events.”

Seattle Channel programs that won first-place awards include the public-affairs program City Inside/Out with Brian Callanan; the showcase of Seattle’s creative scene Art Zone with Nancy Guppy; Civic Cocktail, civic conversations with a twist; and Community Stories, which features documentaries about Seattle’s inspiring people, programs and cultural traditions.

“Our staff is committed to building strong, engaged and inspired communities through compelling content and quality production,” said John Giamberso, Seattle Channel general manager. “It’s an honor to receive this recognition from our national peers in local government.”

Here is a listing of Seattle Channel’s 2016 NATOA awards:

Excellence in Government Programming

First Place

Public Affairs: City Inside/Out – Homelessness http://www.seattlechannel.org/CityInsideOut/episodes?videoid=x61637

Interview/Talk Show: Civic Cocktail http://www.seattlechannel.org/CivicCocktail/episodes?videoid=x61635

Arts and Entertainment: Art Zone with Nancy Guppy http://www.seattlechannel.org/ArtZone/episodes?videoid=x62379

Profile of a City/County Department: CityStream – Solar in Seattle

http://www.seattlechannel.org/explore-videos?videoid=x55663

Documentary: Community Stories – Massive Monkees: The Beacon http://www.seattlechannel.org/CommunityStories?videoid=x62211

Use of social media: Seattle Channel communications/web team

 

Second Place

Ethnic Experience: Community Stories – An American Hero: Shiro Kashino http://www.seattlechannel.org/CommunityStories?videoid=x59988

Profile of a City/County Department: CityStream – City of Seattle Paid Parental Leave and Gender Pay Equity http://www.seattlechannel.org/explore-videos?videoid=x60344

Public Education: Citizen University TV – Democracy Vouchers

http://www.seattlechannel.org/CitizenUniversityTV?videoid=x62151

Editing: Seattle Channel production staff

 

Third Place

Election Coverage: City Inside/Out – Council Elections (District 3 Debate)

http://www.seattlechannel.org/CityInsideOut/episodes?videoid=x58520

Visual Arts: Art Zone with Nancy Guppy—Show Open http://www.seattlechannel.org/artZone?videoid=x67963

Magazine Format Series: CityStream http://www.seattlechannel.org/feature-shows/citystream

Honorable Mention Seniors: CityStream – Senior Self Defense http://www.seattlechannel.org/explore-videos?videoid=x57404

Seattle Channel is a local TV station that reflects, informs and inspires the community it serves. Seattle Channel presents programs on cable television – channel 21 on Comcast (321 HD) and Wave (721 HD) – and via the Internet to help residents connect with their city. Programming includes series and special features highlighting the diverse civic and cultural landscape of the Pacific Northwest’s premier city.

Proposed Seattle Information and Technology Budget 2017-2018

A Message from City of Seattle’s Chief Technology Officer: 

Today Mayor Murray presented his proposed 2017-18 Budget to the City Council.

This has been a year of transition for the City’s technology functions and staff. The creation of the Seattle Information Technology Department (Seattle IT) provided an opportunity to create the City’s first unified technology budget and provided clarity into IT spending. Creating this budget is no small feat – it required merging 16 budgets into one, coordinating with finance staff from across departments to clarify and align disparate accounting treatments, and standing up a new financial management tool. While many of the methods remained the same, the 2017-18 Seattle IT budget proposal will represent a clean start for how we manage technology spend.

This first consolidated budget is aligned with five strategic priorities that will help advance Seattle IT’s ability to deliver on its objectives and advance technology across the City.

  • System and service maturity. Many of Seattle IT’s services have not evolved at the same pace as the technology advances of the past decade, nor are investments being made to automate service delivery or improve service levels. Focusing on service and system maturity will lower ongoing operational costs and improve the customer experience. The proposed budget includes funding to ensure the City maintains an acceptable level of security and can be more proactive in responding to security threats. It also adds resources to improve the City’s identity management and mobility service offerings – key components in maturing our application and infrastructure operations.
  • Smart, data-driven City. Data has the potential to drive innovation and efficiency, improving both our quality of life and economic productivity.  Unlocking the promise of a smart, data-driven city requires a focus on data governance, consistent tools that facilitate cross-department collaboration, and educating the public on how to leverage the City’s resources. In the 2017-2018 proposed budget, projects such as Seattle Police Department’s data analytics platform and the Human Services Department data-to-decisions database will help those departments make data-driven decisions to improve their services. In addition, investments in our civic technology, open data, and business intelligence programs will allow the City to engage the public and collaborate on solutions that improve our quality of life.
  • Digital Equity. Internet access and the skills necessary to be successful online are vitally important to Seattle residents. In 2016 the City put forth specific strategies and actions, developed by our community-led Digital Equity Action Committee, to bridge this digital divide.  The Initiative is one part of the Mayor’s broadband strategy to increase access, affordability, and public-private-community partnerships. The proposed budget includes additional positions to deliver on our digital equity strategies. In addition, the Mayor’s Youth Participatory budget program allocated funds to increase the number of Wi-Fi hotspots available through the Seattle Public Library’s checkout program, increasing the number of homes that will have internet access.
  • Public experience. Technology can greatly improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of government services by facilitating, automating, and streamlining interactions among the public, government employees, service providers, and other stakeholders. The proposed budget includes funding to expand the use of a customer engagement and relationship system and a new grant application system to improve the City’s engagement with the public. The budget also expands the Citywide web team.
  • Optimization. Seattle IT was created to increase the value delivered from the City’s information technology investment. Shared IT functions provide common strategy, structure and key enterprise services across City government.  Through funding in the proposed 2017-18, we will continue to optimizing the department’s structure and change how the City develops and operates applications. We will also continue to invest in enterprise architecture, business relationship management, resource management, and project portfolio management.

 

In total, the 2017 Proposed Operating Budget for Seattle IT is $203 million with another $42 million in our Capital Improvement Program. Read the Mayor’s budget speech at http://murray.seattle.gov/.

 

I’m proud of our Seattle IT team for all of their achievements in our first six months working together as a new department and excited for what we will achieve through Mayor Murray’s proposed 2017-18 budget. Together we will deliver powerful technology solutions for the City and public we serve.

 

Sincerely,

Michael Mattmiller, CTO

 

David Doyle is the City’s New Open Data Program Manager

David Doyle, Open Data Program Manager

David Doyle, Open Data Program Manager

David Doyle has been hired as the Open Data Program Manager for the City of Seattle. David will work alongside the current manager, Bruce Blood, who will be retiring in January. He will primarily focus on continuing the implementation of the Open Data policy signed by Mayor Ed Murray on February 1, 2016. This work involves coordinating efforts across all city departments to accelerate the publishing of high value datasets into http://data.seattle.gov. He’ll also partner closely with the City’s Community Technology Advocate, Candace Faber, on initiatives that strengthen Open Data’s role as a key pillar in the City’s Civic Engagement strategy, as well as participating in various efforts to represent and promote the City of Seattle as a leading Smart City in the US.

Prior to joining the City of Seattle, David worked at Microsoft for over 18 years within the Windows localization and internationalization teams. Most recently he ran a Data Insights team that focused on Windows 10 worldwide customer data, analyzing data from hundreds of millions of customers to provide insights into customer usage patterns outside of the US and ensuring that key customer feedback from those markets was prioritized and addressed. Prior to that role, he managed test teams that focused on assuring the localization quality of several major releases of the Windows operating system in over 100 languages, culminating with the Windows 10 initial release in July 2015.

David’s passion for Open Data resulted in him completing a policy analysis of the impacts of an Open Data Law for Washington State for his Capstone research project when earning a Master of Arts in Policy Studies from University of Washington-Bothell, in 2015. He is an active member of the eGov Committee, a sub-committee of Seattle’s Community Technology Advisory Board (CTAB), which advises and supports the City on technology initiatives. David also holds an Master of Science in Technology Management from University College Dublin, Ireland, and a Bachelor of Science in Applied Sciences (Computer Science & Physics) from the Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland.