Do you have an opinion on Wave Broadband services?

waveWe’d like to hear from you!

Wave Broadband’s cable franchise to operate in the City of Seattle expires November 2017.

As part of the franchise renewal process, the City is gathering input from community members on future cable-related interests and needs.

If you’re a Wave Broadband customer, we’d like to hear from you:

In-person

June 29, 2016, Wednesday, 7-8:30 p.m. at the Jefferson Community Center, 3801 Beacon Ave S, 98108

July 20, 2016, Wednesday, 6:15-7:45 p.m. at the Douglass Truth Library, 2300 E Yesler Way, 98122

  • Co-Sponsored with the City’s Community Technology Advisory Board

On-line

Comment form: www.seattle.gov/tech/cable-renewal-response

Survey: www.surveymonkey.com/r/CityOfSeattleWaveCableSurvey

Via email

cableoffice@seattle.gov

Over the phone

206.684.8498

Seattle Channel Wins Two Regional Emmy Awards

seattle channel logo

SEATTLE CHANNEL, Cable 21

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 6, 2016

Contact: Lori Patrick, (206) 733-9764
lori.patrick@seattle.gov

               

Station recognized for historic/cultural programming

SEATTLE – Seattle Channel is the recipient of two Northwest Regional Emmy Awards for historic/cultural programming, one for a segment about the Georgetown Steam Plant and another for an animated short film about a local World War II veteran.

 

The city-operated station was recognized Saturday, June 4 at the Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Arts & Sciences’ (NATAS) Emmy Awards ceremony.

 

“Seattle Channel’s in-depth coverage of City Hall and Seattle’s diverse communities helps residents stay informed, engaged and connected with their city,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “I congratulate the station on its work and its commitment to inspiring civic engagement.”

 

A CityStream story about the Georgetown Steam Plant, now the Georgetown PowerPlant Museum, won in the historic/cultural segment category. A blast from Seattle’s past, the plant was built in 1906 mostly to power the city’s electric streetcar system. The segment was produced, photographed and edited by Ralph Bevins. Watch the winning segment: http://www.seattlechannel.org/explore-videos?videoid=x57291.

 

Shiro Kashino, a World War II veteran who grew up in Seattle’s Central District, is the subject of an animated short film, An American Hero: Shiro Kashino, which won in the historic/cultural program category. The feature, part of Seattle Channel’s Community Stories series, draws from the graphic novel Fighting for America: Nisei Soldiers, written by Lawrence Matsuda and illustrated by Matt Sasaki. The piece was produced and directed by Shannon Gee, animated by Randy Eng, with audio engineering and sound design by Thomas Cavit and writing by Lawrence Matsuda. Watch the winning feature: http://seattlechannel.org/CommunityStories?videoid=x59988.

 

“Seattle Channel is a catalyst that helps bring people together and develop a better understanding of our changing city,” said Seattle City Council President Bruce Harrell, chair of the Council’s Education, Equity and Governance Committee. “The station’s inclusive programming features a variety of voices on subjects ranging from public policy to the people and cultural traditions that comprise Seattle.”

 

In the 53rd annual Northwest Emmy Awards, Seattle Channel competed against commercial and public television stations in the Northwest NATAS five-state region which includes Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. This year, the station received 17 Emmy nominations in program categories including overall station excellence, arts/entertainment, health/science, politics/government, interview/discussion, promotion/program campaign as well as photography and editing.

 

“Seattle Channel is committed to producing quality content with depth and impact,” said John Giamberso, Seattle Channel general manager. “Our public-affairs programs spark informed civic dialogue and our arts features and documentaries entertain and inspire. I applaud our talented team for its dedication to excellence in local programming.”

 

Seattle Channel is a local TV station that reflects, informs and inspires the community it serves. Seattle Channel presents programs on cable television – channel 21 on Comcast (321 HD) and Wave (721 HD) – and via the Internet at seattlechannel.org to help residents connect with their city. Programming includes series and special features highlighting the diverse civic and cultural landscape of the Pacific Northwest’s premier city.

Civic Tech News — What Works Cities Initiative in Seattle

https___img_evbuc_com_https%253A%252F%252Fcdn_evbuc_com%252Fimages%252F21095394%252F25356730269%252F1%252ForiginalSince 2015, the City of Seattle has been working quietly on a number of programs to make our government more data-driven, results-oriented, and innovative. We passed a new open data policy that balances transparency and privacy. We are shifting to a new model for performance management, both within the City and with our contractors. We are using design thinking to explore new approaches to big issues such as youth unemployment and homelessness, with a 5-person team in Mayor Murray’s Office of Policy & Innovation dedicated to one project at a time. What has made such big changes possible in such a short period of time? The common thread is Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Inspired by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s experiences using data and design thinking to improve that city, Bloomberg Philanthropies has created a number of initiatives that make it possible for other cities to explore what “works.” These include What Works Cities (hyperlink: http://whatworkscities.bloomberg.org/about/), a national initiative for mid-sized cities to improve use of data and evidence in decision-making, and Innovation Teams (hyperlink:http://www.bloomberg.org/program/government-innovation/innovation-teams/). Under Mayor Murray’s leadership, our city is taking full advantage of both. Seattle is one of the pilot cities in What Works Cities and currently has an Innovation Team in its second year of operations.

What Works Cities Panel: Chrissie Grover-Roybal, Tina Walha, Tyler Running Deer and Candace Faber

What Works Cities Panel:
Chrissie Grover-Roybal, Tina Walha, Tyler Running Deer and Candace Faber

 

On May 26, Seattle IT hosted a panel discussion at the local Impact Hub to share the work these groups are doing with the broader public. The panel was moderated by Candace Faber, the City’s Civic Technology Advocate, and featured:

  • Tyler Running Deer, Seattle’s Organizational Performance Director, who has been leading the City of Seattle’s engagement under the What Works Cities program,
  • Chrissie Grover-Roybal, Innovation Fellow with the Government Performance Lab at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and
  • Tina Walha, Director of the Innovation Team in the Mayor’s Office of Policy and Innovation.

 

Over 60 people attended May 26 Event at Impact Hub

Over 60 people attended May 26 Event at Impact Hub

The City of Seattle joined What Works Cities in August 2015 as one of eight cities in the first national cohort, setting goals for three projects: to research and establish a Citywide Open Data policy and program; to design and develop a Citywide, central organizational performance program; and to explore, analyze, and establish a pilot results-driven contracting practice to improve the outputs and outcomes of contracted services to the public.

 

The first two projects are complete from the What Works Cities perspective, having now been institutionalized in the City through dedicated full-time positions in Seattle IT and the Mayor’s Office as well as new roles for existing staff across departments. The performance team is working on a strategic framework and a toolkit to help city departments better use data and information to manage services and programs, anticipated to be complete by mid-2016. The third project, led here by Chrissie Grover-Roybal, is still in progress, and reorients the structure and management of homeless services contracts to focus on improving outcomes for people experiencing homelessness.

 

The Innovation Team spent its first year examining strategies to increase access to opportunity and decrease the impact of violence among Seattle’s young Black men, ages 14 to 24. This year, the team will be focused on addressing Seattle’s homelessness crisis. To learn more about the Innovation Team, check out http://murray.seattle.gov/innovationteam.

City of Seattle Wins 2016 EPEAT Sustainable Purchasing Award

photo of the awardThe Green Electronics Council (GEC) today announced the winners of the 2016 EPEAT Sustainable Purchasing Awards, which recognize excellence in the procurement of sustainable electronics. EPEAT is a free and trusted source of environmental product ratings that makes it easy for purchasers to select high-performance electronics that support their organization’s sustainability goals. EPEAT is managed by the Green Electronics Council.

The City of Seattle was one of 38 award winners representing a wide range of organizations, including national and provincial/state governments, leading academic institutions and the healthcare sector.

Read the EPEAT press release.

Seattle Channel Receives 17 Emmy Nominations

seattle channel logo

Originally Posted April 4, 2016 by Seattle Channel

Seattle Channel is honored to receive 17 Northwest Regional Emmy-award nominations from the Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS). The station’s nominations include overall station excellence with the channel competing against some of the region’s commercial and public television stations.

The 2016 nominations were announced Friday night and highlight the quality of several Seattle Channel series, including public-affairs program City Inside/Out; documentary series Community Stories; weekly magazine show CityStream and several Art Zone segments.

“These nominations underscore Seattle Channel’s commitment to helping Seattle residents connect with their city from its history, to its artists, to its public policies,” said John Giamberso, Seattle Channel general manager. “I congratulate the staff on its work.”

The Northwest regional Emmy awards will be announced June 4. The NATAS region includes five states: Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.

Here is a listing of Seattle Channel’s 17 Emmy nominations:

Overall Excellence – Seattle Channel
• Seattle Channel • John Giamberso, general manager

Arts/Entertainment – Feature/Segment
Art Zone: Ernie Sapiro: Musician Project:  Ralph Bevins, producer/photographer; Valerie Vozza, photographer
Art Zone: Glenn Rudolph: Ralph Bevins, producer/photographer/editor

Arts/Entertainment – Program/Special
Community Stories: Enfu: Ian Devier, producer; Shannon Gee, senior producer

Historic/Cultural – Feature/Segment
CityStream: Taiko!: Ian Devier, producer
CityStream: Georgetown Steam Plant: Ralph Bevins, producer/photographer/editor
Art Zone: Louie Gong: Valerie Vozza, DP/editor; Kathy Tuohey, producer

Historic/Cultural – Program/Special
Community Stories: An American Hero: Shiro Kashino: Shannon Gee, producer/director; Randy Eng, animation; Stephen Thomas Cavit, audio engineer/sound designer; Lawrence Matsuda, writer

Health/Science – Program/Special
CityStream: Science Fun: Megan Erb, senior producer; Shannon Gee, producer; Randy Eng, photographer/editor; Roberta Romero, host

Politics/Government – Program/Special
City Inside/Out: Juvenile Justice: Susan Han, senior producer; Brian Callanan, host/producer; Matt Peterson, photographer/editor

Interview/Discussion – Program/Special
Art Zone: Duff McKagan Interview: Nancy Guppy, senior producer/host; Ralph Bevins, photographer/editor; Peggy Lycett, editor
City Inside/Out: Rental Rules: Susan Han, senior producer; Brian Callanan, host/producer; Matt Peterson, photographer/editor

Promotion/Program/Campaign
Seattle Channel: It’s Not What You Think: Ian Devier, producer/editor/photographer; Kevin Patnik, creative director; Lori Patrick, producer/communications manager; Bryan Cox, art director; Judy Stuhmer, senior designer; Molly Beier, project manager

Photographer/Video Essay
Art Zone: Hak Bo Lee: Valerie Vozza

Editor/Program
Community Stories: Enfu: Ian Devier
Art Zone: Ernie Sapiro: Musician Project: Ralph Bevins
Community Stories: An American Hero: Shiro Kashino: Shannon Gee and Randy Eng

Hacking for Oceans and Fish — Seattle IT Dives Deep at Fishackathon

All Earth Day weekend long, April 22-24, teams of Seattle technologists joined together at Impact Hub Seattle to explore how we can use data and technology to protect our fish and oceans. “Seattle is defined both by technological innovation and commitment to environmental sustainability,” said Candace Faber, City of Seattle’s Civic Technology Advocate. “What better way to celebrate Earth Day than for both sides of that community to tackle the overfishing challenge together?”

Photo of Fishackathon Participants

Seattle Fishacking Teams 2016

A global event, Fishackathon was coordinated by the U.S. Department of State and held simultaneously in 41 different sites on six continents. Its goal was to find solutions to world fisheries and ocean issues, anchored in 9 narrowly scoped challenges submitted by global experts. In Seattle, the event was organized by Microsoft, Vulcan Inc., the University of Washington, and Open Seattle, with support from Seattle IT. Civic Technology Advocate Candace Faber and Open Data Manager Bruce Blood both supported the event.

Photo of fish hackers at work

Fishackers at work

Hackers had access to multiple public, global databases that track things such as vessel identification, as well as expert mentors from the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and Vulcan’s Illegal Fishing programs, among others. World-leading expert Ray Hilborn gave the keynote, and local celebrity chef Ethan Stowell personally served fresh, sustainably caught seafood on the first night.

Photo of happy fish hackers

Fishackers Tackle Overfishing

Seattle’s teams created apps and prototypes aligned with several of the challenges. The most popular were fish identification and monitoring lost fishing gear. One team also took on a challenge not listed, visualizing GIS data from a boat’s point of view rather than a bird’s-eye. King Triton, Seattle’s winning team, developed a solution that uses fishing vessel data to catch those breaking international and other laws governing the fishing industry.

The team’s proposal will be submitted to the U.S. State Department’s global competition and the winner will be announced on World Ocean’s Day, June 8, 2016. The winning team will receive a $10,000 cash prize, and their solution will be funded by a third party developer funded by the State Department.

Photo of Teams receiving awards

Candace Faber, City of Seattle’s Civic Tech Advocate, Lures Hackers with Prizes

Thank you to the event sponsors and mentors, and also to Smart Catch restaurants, the Living Computer Museum, and the Seattle Aquarium for their prizes.

David Keyes, City of Seattle’s Digital Equity Manager, Wins Charles Benton Digital Equity Champion Award

Picture of David Keyes

David Keyes
City of Seattle Digital Equity Manager

The National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA) has named David Keyes, Digital Equity Manager for the City of Seattle, the first recipient of the Charles Benton Digital Equity Champion Award.

“The NDIA is proud to recognize David Keyes, who has championed a holistic approach to closing the ‘Digital Divide’,” said Angela Siefer, NDIA Director.  “David’s approach goes beyond computers and wires to include affordable broadband service, the skills needed to make the most of technology, and the content and services relevant to user’s lives.”

Named for Charles Benton, the founder of the Benton Foundation, the award was created by NDIA to recognize leadership and dedication in advancing digital inclusion:  from promoting the ideal of accessible and affordable communications technology for all Americans, to crafting programs and policies that make it a reality.

In nearly 20 years of public service in Seattle, David Keyes has used data to document community needs and direct programs, been committed to racial and social justice, and built a movement over time by engaging local elected officials, businesses, education partners, and community organizations in solutions.

“In 1997 David was appointed Seattle’s Community Technology planner and within a couple of years he was a leading figure nationally in the movement we then called ‘community technology’,” said Siefer.  “Despite being busy leading the City of Seattle’s model digital equity programs, David continually lends his leadership skills and thoughtful guidance to state and national efforts.”

Keyes will be presented his award on May 18, 2016 at Net Inclusion: The National Digital Inclusion Summit in Kansas City by Adrianne B. Furniss, Executive Director of the Benton Foundation.

CenturyLink Announces Prism TV Price Increase

CenturyLink announced that the price of Prism TV video service will increase by $7.00, effective with March 18, 2016 billings. Except for customers who are on a ‘Price Lock’ agreement, the increase will effect all service packages and promotional offers. With the price increase CenturyLink’s new standard service rates will be:

Prism TV Package New Pricing
Basic $29.99
Essential $81.99
Complete $96.99
Preferred $111.99
Premium $141.99

The price of CenturyLink’s High Speed Internet modem will also be increased by $1.00.

If you are currently a CenturyLink Prism TV customer receiving a promotional discount on your service, but didn’t not sign up for ‘Price Lock’ when you subscribed, then your monthly service rate will increase by $7.00. You will also continue to receive the discount applied to the new rate for the remainder of your promotional period. Your rate and any discount should be clearly indicated on your billing statement.

CenturyLink has sent customers a notice alerting them to these upcoming price increases. If you have questions on how this increase will impact your individual bill, contact CenturyLink Customer Care at (866) 755-7435.

If you are a low income CenturyLink customer and would like information on whether you are eligible for CenturyLink’s service discount programs, call (877) 837-5738 or visit CenturyLink Low Income Assistance Programs.

 

City launches new Seattle.gov

Seattle.gov website

The City of Seattle recently launched its redesigned website, http://www.seattle.gov/, to better connect the public with their government.

“Seattle.gov should reflect the City’s vibrant and innovative spirit,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “Thanks to the hard work of our Department of Information Technology’s Citywide Web team, the updated site makes it easier for the public and businesses to access services, find information, and participate in critical conversations with City government.”

The new website is based on a mobile-friendly design approach and a desire to help visitors find information easily. The new website strives to be user-centric, organizing content primarily by City services instead of City departments.

“The new Seattle.gov makes it easier to access city information any time, especially from the mobile devices increasingly used to request city services,” said Chief Technology Officer Michael Mattmiller. “Using modern tools and technology to connect the public with their government is critical to the civic health of Seattle and we look forward to evolving the new website, adding content and new features that increase user engagement on a regular basis.”

City staff is designing and building the new Seattle.gov over a three-year period, with all City pages updated in phased releases. The initial launch release includes the following:

The design of the entire City website will be completed in 2018.