City of Seattle Wins 2016 EPEAT Sustainable Purchasing Award

The Green Electronics Council (GEC) today announced the winners of the 2016 EPEAT Sustainable Purchasing Awards, which recognize excellence in the procurement of sustainable electronics. EPEAT is a free and trusted source of environmental product ratings that makes it easy for purchasers to select high-performance electronics that support their organization’s sustainability goals. EPEAT is managed by the Green Electronics Council.

The City of Seattle was one of 38 award winners representing a wide range of organizations, including national and provincial/state governments, leading academic institutions and the healthcare sector.

Read the EPEAT press release.

Seattle Channel Receives 17 Emmy Nominations

seattle channel logo

Originally Posted April 4, 2016 by Seattle Channel

Seattle Channel is honored to receive 17 Northwest Regional Emmy-award nominations from the Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS). The station’s nominations include overall station excellence with the channel competing against some of the region’s commercial and public television stations.

The 2016 nominations were announced Friday night and highlight the quality of several Seattle Channel series, including public-affairs program City Inside/Out; documentary series Community Stories; weekly magazine show CityStream and several Art Zone segments.

“These nominations underscore Seattle Channel’s commitment to helping Seattle residents connect with their city from its history, to its artists, to its public policies,” said John Giamberso, Seattle Channel general manager. “I congratulate the staff on its work.”

The Northwest regional Emmy awards will be announced June 4. The NATAS region includes five states: Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.

Here is a listing of Seattle Channel’s 17 Emmy nominations:

Overall Excellence – Seattle Channel
• Seattle Channel • John Giamberso, general manager

Arts/Entertainment – Feature/Segment
Art Zone: Ernie Sapiro: Musician Project:  Ralph Bevins, producer/photographer; Valerie Vozza, photographer
Art Zone: Glenn Rudolph: Ralph Bevins, producer/photographer/editor

Arts/Entertainment – Program/Special
Community Stories: Enfu: Ian Devier, producer; Shannon Gee, senior producer

Historic/Cultural – Feature/Segment
CityStream: Taiko!: Ian Devier, producer
CityStream: Georgetown Steam Plant: Ralph Bevins, producer/photographer/editor
Art Zone: Louie Gong: Valerie Vozza, DP/editor; Kathy Tuohey, producer

Historic/Cultural – Program/Special
Community Stories: An American Hero: Shiro Kashino: Shannon Gee, producer/director; Randy Eng, animation; Stephen Thomas Cavit, audio engineer/sound designer; Lawrence Matsuda, writer

Health/Science – Program/Special
CityStream: Science Fun: Megan Erb, senior producer; Shannon Gee, producer; Randy Eng, photographer/editor; Roberta Romero, host

Politics/Government – Program/Special
City Inside/Out: Juvenile Justice: Susan Han, senior producer; Brian Callanan, host/producer; Matt Peterson, photographer/editor

Interview/Discussion – Program/Special
Art Zone: Duff McKagan Interview: Nancy Guppy, senior producer/host; Ralph Bevins, photographer/editor; Peggy Lycett, editor
City Inside/Out: Rental Rules: Susan Han, senior producer; Brian Callanan, host/producer; Matt Peterson, photographer/editor

Promotion/Program/Campaign
Seattle Channel: It’s Not What You Think: Ian Devier, producer/editor/photographer; Kevin Patnik, creative director; Lori Patrick, producer/communications manager; Bryan Cox, art director; Judy Stuhmer, senior designer; Molly Beier, project manager

Photographer/Video Essay
Art Zone: Hak Bo Lee: Valerie Vozza

Editor/Program
Community Stories: Enfu: Ian Devier
Art Zone: Ernie Sapiro: Musician Project: Ralph Bevins
Community Stories: An American Hero: Shiro Kashino: Shannon Gee and Randy Eng

Hacking for Oceans and Fish — Seattle IT Dives Deep at Fishackathon

All Earth Day weekend long, April 22-24, teams of Seattle technologists joined together at Impact Hub Seattle to explore how we can use data and technology to protect our fish and oceans. “Seattle is defined both by technological innovation and commitment to environmental sustainability,” said Candace Faber, City of Seattle’s Civic Technology Advocate. “What better way to celebrate Earth Day than for both sides of that community to tackle the overfishing challenge together?”

Photo of Fishackathon Participants

Seattle Fishacking Teams 2016

A global event, Fishackathon was coordinated by the U.S. Department of State and held simultaneously in 41 different sites on six continents. Its goal was to find solutions to world fisheries and ocean issues, anchored in 9 narrowly scoped challenges submitted by global experts. In Seattle, the event was organized by Microsoft, Vulcan Inc., the University of Washington, and Open Seattle, with support from Seattle IT. Civic Technology Advocate Candace Faber and Open Data Manager Bruce Blood both supported the event.

Photo of fish hackers at work

Fishackers at work

Hackers had access to multiple public, global databases that track things such as vessel identification, as well as expert mentors from the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and Vulcan’s Illegal Fishing programs, among others. World-leading expert Ray Hilborn gave the keynote, and local celebrity chef Ethan Stowell personally served fresh, sustainably caught seafood on the first night.

Photo of happy fish hackers

Fishackers Tackle Overfishing

Seattle’s teams created apps and prototypes aligned with several of the challenges. The most popular were fish identification and monitoring lost fishing gear. One team also took on a challenge not listed, visualizing GIS data from a boat’s point of view rather than a bird’s-eye. King Triton, Seattle’s winning team, developed a solution that uses fishing vessel data to catch those breaking international and other laws governing the fishing industry.

The team’s proposal will be submitted to the U.S. State Department’s global competition and the winner will be announced on World Ocean’s Day, June 8, 2016. The winning team will receive a $10,000 cash prize, and their solution will be funded by a third party developer funded by the State Department.

Photo of Teams receiving awards

Candace Faber, City of Seattle’s Civic Tech Advocate, Lures Hackers with Prizes

Thank you to the event sponsors and mentors, and also to Smart Catch restaurants, the Living Computer Museum, and the Seattle Aquarium for their prizes.

David Keyes, City of Seattle’s Digital Equity Manager, Wins Charles Benton Digital Equity Champion Award

Picture of David Keyes

David Keyes
City of Seattle Digital Equity Manager

The National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA) has named David Keyes, Digital Equity Manager for the City of Seattle, the first recipient of the Charles Benton Digital Equity Champion Award.

“The NDIA is proud to recognize David Keyes, who has championed a holistic approach to closing the ‘Digital Divide’,” said Angela Siefer, NDIA Director.  “David’s approach goes beyond computers and wires to include affordable broadband service, the skills needed to make the most of technology, and the content and services relevant to user’s lives.”

Named for Charles Benton, the founder of the Benton Foundation, the award was created by NDIA to recognize leadership and dedication in advancing digital inclusion:  from promoting the ideal of accessible and affordable communications technology for all Americans, to crafting programs and policies that make it a reality.

In nearly 20 years of public service in Seattle, David Keyes has used data to document community needs and direct programs, been committed to racial and social justice, and built a movement over time by engaging local elected officials, businesses, education partners, and community organizations in solutions.

“In 1997 David was appointed Seattle’s Community Technology planner and within a couple of years he was a leading figure nationally in the movement we then called ‘community technology’,” said Siefer.  “Despite being busy leading the City of Seattle’s model digital equity programs, David continually lends his leadership skills and thoughtful guidance to state and national efforts.”

Keyes will be presented his award on May 18, 2016 at Net Inclusion: The National Digital Inclusion Summit in Kansas City by Adrianne B. Furniss, Executive Director of the Benton Foundation.

CenturyLink Announces Prism TV Price Increase

CenturyLink announced that the price of Prism TV video service will increase by $7.00, effective with March 18, 2016 billings. Except for customers who are on a ‘Price Lock’ agreement, the increase will effect all service packages and promotional offers. With the price increase CenturyLink’s new standard service rates will be:

Prism TV Package New Pricing
Basic $29.99
Essential $81.99
Complete $96.99
Preferred $111.99
Premium $141.99

The price of CenturyLink’s High Speed Internet modem will also be increased by $1.00.

If you are currently a CenturyLink Prism TV customer receiving a promotional discount on your service, but didn’t not sign up for ‘Price Lock’ when you subscribed, then your monthly service rate will increase by $7.00. You will also continue to receive the discount applied to the new rate for the remainder of your promotional period. Your rate and any discount should be clearly indicated on your billing statement.

CenturyLink has sent customers a notice alerting them to these upcoming price increases. If you have questions on how this increase will impact your individual bill, contact CenturyLink Customer Care at (866) 755-7435.

If you are a low income CenturyLink customer and would like information on whether you are eligible for CenturyLink’s service discount programs, call (877) 837-5738 or visit CenturyLink Low Income Assistance Programs.

 

City launches new Seattle.gov

Seattle.gov website

The City of Seattle recently launched its redesigned website, http://www.seattle.gov/, to better connect the public with their government.

“Seattle.gov should reflect the City’s vibrant and innovative spirit,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “Thanks to the hard work of our Department of Information Technology’s Citywide Web team, the updated site makes it easier for the public and businesses to access services, find information, and participate in critical conversations with City government.”

The new website is based on a mobile-friendly design approach and a desire to help visitors find information easily. The new website strives to be user-centric, organizing content primarily by City services instead of City departments.

“The new Seattle.gov makes it easier to access city information any time, especially from the mobile devices increasingly used to request city services,” said Chief Technology Officer Michael Mattmiller. “Using modern tools and technology to connect the public with their government is critical to the civic health of Seattle and we look forward to evolving the new website, adding content and new features that increase user engagement on a regular basis.”

City staff is designing and building the new Seattle.gov over a three-year period, with all City pages updated in phased releases. The initial launch release includes the following:

The design of the entire City website will be completed in 2018.

Video Voters’ Guide for the General Election Launches

The Seattle Channel's non-partisan video voter's guide.

The Seattle Channel’s non-partisan video voter’s guide.

We told you about the Seattle and King County Video Voters’ Guide for the primary election last July. Now we’re approaching the general election.

– Want a transparent look at the candidates and issues on the Nov. 3 general-election ballot? With the launch of the 2015 general-election Video Voters’ Guide, voters can hear directly from the candidates for various offices as well as learn about city of Seattle and King County ballot measures.

The non-partisan video guide offers candidates on the ballot up to two minutes to issue a prepared statement that outlines the key planks of their platform. Proponents and opponents of ballot measures also issue short statements. The segments are unedited and published online and broadcast on local television. In all, the guide features 42 video statements, which are captioned for increased accessibility.

The Video Voters’ Guide is available on Seattle Channel’s website at www.seattlechannel.org/elections. For easy reference, the video statements are organized by race and ballot measure. City and county versions of the Video Voters’ Guide are also airing on Seattle Channel cable channel 21 and King County TV cable channel 22.

“The Video Voters’ Guide is a unique and valuable public resource. It allows voters to hear directly from the candidates and weigh statements on ballot measures,” said John Giamberso, Seattle Channel’s general manager. “Working with our partners, we’re pleased to provide this comprehensive guide which offers another vantage point for voters. The guide brings to life the candidates and the issues in a convenient format.”

The Video Voters’ Guide features candidates who will appear on the ballot for Seattle City Council and Seattle School Board. New this year, seven City Council members will be elected by district, with two others elected citywide. The guide also features candidates for seats on the Port of Seattle Commission, Metropolitan King County Council, director of the King County Department of Elections and King County Assessor.

The guide also features pro and con statements for several city and county ballot measures: the city’s Proposition 1 property-tax request, known as the Move Seattle transportation levy; Initiative 122, which would make changes to the way city elections are funded; a county levy to fund early-childhood programs, known as the Best Start for Kids levy; and King County Charter Amendment No. 1, which would strengthen the role of the county’s civilian Office of Law Enforcement Oversight.

Primary ballots must be postmarked or returned to a ballot drop box by 8 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 3.

The Video Voters’ Guide is a project of Seattle Channel, Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission and King County TV.

Seattle Channel is a local TV station that reflects, informs and inspires the community it serves. Seattle Channel presents programs on cable television – channel 21 on Comcast (321 HD) and Wave (721 HD) – and via the Internet to help residents connect with their city. Programming includes series and special features highlighting the diverse civic and cultural landscape of the Pacific Northwest’s premier city.

Seattle Is Rolling Out Its Innovative Privacy Program

The City of Seattle continues to lead the nation in protecting citizens’ privacy.  Last fall, the Mayor and City Council launched the City’s new Privacy Initiative.  In February 2015, Seattle’s Privacy Principle’s were announced.

privacytoolkitThe next phase, the toolkit for Seattle’s Privacy Initiative, is now being implemented.  The toolkit will guide City departments on how to incorporate these principles into daily operations.

“Seattle is leading the nation to implement a comprehensive privacy program across all City departments,” said Seattle Mayor Ed Murray. “Our privacy principles are designed to protect individual privacy while still providing government transparency.”

The Privacy Toolkit will provide guidelines for how each department will implement a privacy assessment. Departments will also identify a privacy champion who will work with a privacy manager at the Department of Information Technology.

“This is a game changer in how we operate and do business to ensure we uphold the highest standard for your privacy,” said Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Council’s Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology Committee. “We have come up with the right balance of transparency, accountability and flexibility.”

The privacy principles and the toolkit were created by an interdepartmental team comprised of more than 10 departments and an external Privacy Advisory Committee comprised of community members and privacy experts from private industry, law firms, privacy advocates and academia. The mayor’s budget for 2016 includes funding for a Chief Privacy Officer for the City who will be charged with implementing the principles.

“This is the first time any city in the country has taken steps to protect the public’s private information whenever possible,” said Councilmember Mike O’Brien. “This groundbreaking toolkit will help city employees think proactively about potential privacy implications with regards to any data or personal information we collect in the course of regular City business or when evaluating a new policy or program,”

In November 2014, the City launched its Privacy Initiative, led by the Seattle Police Department and Department of Information Technology. The initiative defined how the City collects, uses, and disposes of data in a manner that balances the needs of the City to conduct its business with individual privacy. For more information on the City’s Privacy Initiative, visit http://www.seattle.gov/information-technology/initiatives/privacy-initiative

Seattle is one of the first cities in the nation to establish its own privacy principles to protect personal information. City partners and vendors are instructed to follow the same guidelines.